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WBHIDCO to prepare master plan on outdoor advertising policy in view of ‘green city’ concept

 MPost |  2016-09-27 02:28:25.0  |  Kolkata

WBHIDCO to prepare master plan on outdoor advertising policy in view of ‘green city’ concept

The West Bengal Housing and Infrastructure Development Corporation (WBHIDCO) has proposed to prepare a master plan on outdoor advertisement policy keeping in mind the ‘green city’ concept.
Delhi-based DIMTS officials met their counterparts in WBHIDCO and gave a presentation on outdoor advertisement last week.

It may be mentioned that the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) had removed all the billboards from the heritage zone as they were causing visual pollution. The banners of political parties were removed from the zone on this ground.

But till today, the KMC has failed to pen an advertisement policy where sizes of the billboard would be mentioned clearly and also other specifications, like illumination.

Many drivers often complain about some billboards on the Eastern Metropolitan Bypass that they cause harm to their eyes and affect their driving. But as street furniture is not carefully studied, these billboards have not been removed.

During discussion, it came up that the billboards that make people aware of some policies taken by the state government or agencies can fetch revenue also.

It was pointed out by the officials of WBHIDCO that it was often found that the advertising agencies 
were interested only in putting up their advertisement and flout the commitment made by them to the authorities.

The WBHIDCO will construct the display boards to maintain smart street furniture.

In the 1950s till 1970s Kolkata was famous for aesthetic street furniture. Park Street displayed the billboards of different products which had attracted people.

Parimal Roy, famous art collector said the billboards made of enamel became a matter of the past and many collectors mostly from Mumbai took them as items in private collection.

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