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Tale of two cities

Tale of two cities
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The evening started with the short introduction by Ashok Vajpayee, followed by short word on Kraków and literature by Prof  Piotr Klodkowski.

Piaskowski took the audience through a presentation on Krakow City of literature. Urvashi Butalia made contemporary remarks on the literature of both the cities. Michal Rusinek gave an insight into the Krakow literature. The event was concluded with an interactive discussion with the audience.

After a three-year wait, Kraków become the UNESCO City of Literature,  21 October 2013. Kraków is the seventh city to be granted this honour, following Edinburgh, Melbourne, Iowa City, Dublin, Reykjavík and Norwich.

Kraków receiving the title of UNESCO City of Literature bears testament to the cultural heritage of our ancient city and the wealth of its artistic life today.

Kraków has long been an academic and intellectual centre of Europe and a cradle of language and literature; it was the first Polish city to hold scriptoriums, libraries and printing houses, and it is the birthplace of scores of literary masterpieces. It was also home to the authors of Polish modernism – Stanislaw Wyspianski, Stanislaw Przybyszewski and Józef Mehoffer – and more contemporary artists including Karol Wojtyla, Tadeusz Kantor, Stanislaw Lem, Slawomir Mrozek and Andrzej Wajda. It was here that Czeslaw Milosz (awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1980) returned after many years in exile, and it was the home of Wislawa Szymborska (Nobel Prize in 1996) throughout her long life until her passing in 2012.
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