Top
Millennium Post

Store of knowledge

Knowing about the medical treatments available for your pets helps catch treatable diseases early

Store of knowledge
X

My 3 weeks old puppy has small pus-filled bumps on his abdomen and groin. What could be the reason?

Pus filled bumps are a sign of bacterial infections. The most common bacterial infection in pups is Impetigo. Impetigo pustules are very easy to rupture. They appear on the stomach and are filled with liquid. After bursting, they ooze and crust over, and cause discomfort and pain. At this stage, the impetigo is also very contagious, so any puppy or dog with it should be kept away from others until it clears up. Most impetigo clears up on its own, or dissipates with treatment. A medicated shampoo can be used. Get one with benzoyl peroxide and bathe your puppy with it two times a week for 2 to 3 weeks. If the impetigo is not a mild enough case to clear up with only the use of topical treatments, you may need to obtain a round of oral antibiotics or topical antibiotic.

It could also be a sign of distemper. Canine distemper is a virus that affects a dog's respiratory, gastrointestinal, respiratory and central nervous systems, as well as the conjunctival membranes of the eye. The first signs of canine distemper include abdominal pustules, sneezing, coughing and thick mucus coming from the eyes and nose. Fever, lethargy, sudden vomiting and diarrhea, depression and/or loss of appetite are also symptoms of the virus. There is no cure for canine distemper. Treatment for the disease, therefore, is heavily focused on alleviating the symptoms. If the animal has become anorexic or has diarrhea, intravenous supportive fluids may be given. Discharge from the eyes and nose must be cleaned away regularly. Antibiotics may be prescribed to control the symptoms caused by a secondary bacterial infection, and phenobarbitals and potassium bromide may be needed to control convulsions and seizures. There are no antiviral drugs that are effective in treating the disease.

My cat falls asleep while standing and falls over. Why?

Narcolepsy is a disorder that affect the way an animal is able to physically operate. It is symptomized by excessive daytime sleepiness, lack of energy, and brief losses of consciousness. During a narcoleptic episode, the affected cat will collapse onto its side or stomach, its muscles will slacken, and all physical movement briefly ceases. It is just as if the cat has suddenly fallen into a deep sleep. Closed eye movement continues, as with the stage of REM sleep. The episodes are typically brief and go away by themselves. During a narcoleptic episode, the affected cat will collapse onto its side or stomach, its muscles will slacken, and all physical movement briefly ceases. It is just as if the cat has suddenly fallen into a deep sleep. Closed eye movement continues, as with the stage of REM sleep. Generally, narcolepsy has not been linked to any underlying cause. Some of the causes are disorders of the immune system.

(Views expressed and information provided are personal. Send your questions to manekaanimallove@gmail.com)

Next Story
Share it