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2018: For a smarter year

Instead of making promises to the gods, most people make resolutions only to themselves, and focus purely on self-improvement

2018: For a smarter year
Today, resolving to change and improve yourself and your life is an almost unavoidable part of the transition to a new year. Though it's a pretty well documented fact that most New Year's resolutions fail, we keep making them – and we're not alone. The custom of making New Year's resolutions is most common in the West, but it happens all over the world. Take a look back at when and why the New Year's resolution tradition got started, and how it's changed over the course of history.
The ancient Babylonians are said to have been the first people to make New Year's resolutions, some 4,000 years ago. They were also the first to hold recorded celebrations in honour of the new year though for them the year began not in January but in mid-March, when the crops were planted. They also made promises to the gods to pay their debts and return any objects they had borrowed. These promises could be considered the forerunners of our New Year's resolutions. If the Babylonians kept to their word, their (pagan) gods would bestow favour on them for the coming year. If not, they would fall out of the gods' favour – a place no one wanted to be. A similar practice occurred in ancient Rome, after the reform-minded emperor Julius Caesar tinkered with the calendar and established January 1 as the beginning of the new year circa 46 BC named for Janus, the two-faced god whose spirit inhabited doorways and arches, January had special significance for the Romans. Believing that Janus symbolically looked backwards into the previous year and ahead into the future, the Romans offered sacrifices to the deity and made promises of good conduct for the coming year.
For early Christians, the first day of the new year became the traditional occasion for thinking about one's past mistakes and resolving to do and be better in the future. In 1740, the English clergyman John Wesley, founder of Methodism, created the Covenant Renewal Service, most commonly held on New Year's Eve or New Year's Day. Also known as watch night services, they included readings from Scriptures and hymn singing, and served as a spiritual alternative to the raucous celebrations normally held to celebrate the coming of the new year. Now popular within evangelical Protestant churches, especially African-American denominations and congregations, watch night services held on New Year's Eve are often spent praying and making resolutions for the coming year.
Despite the tradition's religious roots, New Year's resolutions today are a mostly secular practice. Instead of making promises to the gods, most people make resolutions only to themselves, and focus purely on self-improvement (which may explain why such resolutions seem so hard to follow on). Yet this won't stop people from making resolutions anytime soon.
To achieve our resolutions, let get SMART this new year.
SMART: That's an acronym coined in the journal Management Review in 1981 for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound. It may work for management and it can also work in setting your resolutions, too.
Specific: Your resolution should be absolutely clear. Making a concrete goal is really important rather than just vaguely saying it.
Measurable: Logging progress into a journal or making notes on your phone or in an app designed to help you track behaviors can reinforce the progress, no matter what your resolution may be.
Achievable: This doesn't mean that you can't have big stretch goals. But trying to take too big a step too fast can leave you frustrated, or affect other areas of your life to the point that your resolution takes over your mental happiness.
Relevant: Is this a goal that really matters to you, and are you making it for the right reasons? If you do it out of the sense of self-hate or remorse or a strong passion in that moment, it doesn't usually last long.
Time-bound: Like "achievable," the timeline toward reaching your goal should be realistic, too. That means giving yourself enough time to do it with lots of smaller intermediate goals set up along the way. Focus on these small wins so you can make gradual progress. Have a SMART 2018.
(Send your questions to roopshashotm@gmail.com)
ROOPSHA Dasguupta RAY

ROOPSHA Dasguupta RAY

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