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Revisiting the Sindhi legacy

 MPost |  2015-03-20 21:18:49.0  |  New Delhi

Revisiting the Sindhi legacy

Sindhi Academy and Department of Art, Culture and Languages, Government of Delhi will present Sindhi Sufi Music and Sindhi Food festival 2015 on March 21 and 22 at Palika Services Officers Institute Lawn, Vinay Marg, Chanakya Puri in the capital. The Sindhi Academy, the festival will bring together some eminent Sindhi singers, and roll out a culinary Sindhi delight for the people of the capital.

The evenings will include Sindhi Sufi Kalam by Indiara Naik, Dushyant Ahuja and Sadhna Bhatia on Day one and performances by Pankaj Jeswani and Mohit Lalwani followed by a special documentary screening on Sindhis of India on March 22. The documentary is scripted by Suresh Khatri.


Deputy Chief Minister of Delhi, Manish Sisiodia will inaugurate the festival on March 21 while Minister for Women and Child, Social Welfare and Languages, Sandeep Kumar, will be the Chief Guest.

A land where the Sufi strain of Islam spawned a highly tolerant and vibrant mysticism, the saints and poets left an indelible mark on the culture. Sindhi way of life has been deeply influenced by Sufi doctrines and principles. Sufi masters such as Shah Abdul Latif and Lal Shahbaz Qalandar are among the most prominent cultural icons of this land.

“The contributions that the region of Sindh made to the composite culture and shared heritage of India and Pakistan cannot and should not be undermined. In a world where many cultures and languages are fighting for survival, it is pertinent that we propagate the richness of Sindhi language, its lyrical beauty and musical heritage to keep its charm intact with the young generation,” says eminent singer artist Indira Naik.

“Art and food are among the most important components of a cultural tradition. In India where the people of Sindhi ethnic origin are scattered around with little contact with the land of their origin, some community members worry about their younger generation losing touch with their past. In this light, it is very important to showcase the culture and legacy of Sindh to inform our youngsters about its richness and resilience. We should all know that Dama Dam Mast Qalandar, the ecstasy-inducing Sufi rendition that everyone loves has its origins in Sindh,” says much popular young singer Mohit Lalwani.

The rich and delicious Sindhi cuisine will be at full flow at the food festival where visitors’ taste buds will be given a delectable treat with many Sindhi delicacies.

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