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Ramayana deconstructed on Delhi stage

 MPost |  2013-10-07 21:21:42.0  |  New Delhi

Ramayana deconstructed on Delhi stage

This festive season be prepared for some twist and turn in the mighty Ramayana, one of the major epics of our Indian literature. Since time immemorial, Ravana has been the instrumental of evil and the good wins over him eventually.

But what about knowing and understanding the asura a little better? Could there be hidden goodness in him, were there any emotions he felt at his losses and did he cry when he lost his kingdom and throne to Ram? These questions and many more aspects will be explored in the play Dasmukha, directed by Vishesh Arora and written by Adhiraj Sharma.

‘Dasmukha is a recreation inspired from the events of Ramayana, showcasing the last days of the great war between the Vanaras led by Lord Ram and the Lankans under king Ravana. The play depicts events from the less heard and told side of Ravana,' explains Arora.

'The play is centered on the ten emotions Ravana possesed in each of his heads. It highlights the human side of the devil with an ideal approach. It narrates the rising and downfall of Ravana portrayed in a much human style,' Arora adds. Dasmukha is being played for the first time in the Capital which will put fore the life of the Lankan ruler from childhood to his time on the throne.

Dasmukha revolves around the last days of the great war between the Vanaras led by Lord Ram and the Lankans under king Ravana. The play depicts events from the hitherto unknown and unexplored side of the Lankan king.  So how authentic are the facts portrayed on stage? A lot of research has been done before the script and characterisation was finalised. One of the major text refered to was Asuraj, explains the director.

'Choosing between family and values is one of the iconic part of this play. It showcases the volatile nature of history. My character of the elder brother to Ravana has been both controversial in good and bad sense since he was a traitor who helped Ram and indulged in treachery against his own blood. It's like a moralistic lesson in the contemporary world because the moles still exist in our system,' said Manil Mayank Mishra who essays the role of Vibhishana.

Mark in the dates and drop in for a new, more humane side of the Asura King (Ravana) and gain a new perspective of history.



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