Top
Millennium Post

MQM chief in trouble, Pak forces crackdown on Hussain’s party

MQM chief in trouble, Pak forces crackdown on Hussain’s party
X
Mutthaida Qaumi Movement (MQM) chief Altaf Hussain’s posters were removed from several party offices and streets in Karachi after his anti-Pakistan diatribe, even as more top party leaders distanced themselves from his remarks.

The posters of the self-exiled leader were taken down a day after the party leadership in Karachi distanced itself from Hussain’s earlier anti-Pakistan comments and decided to strip him of organisational powers for an indefinite period.

In a new audio clip, Hussain, while addressing an event in the US via telephone from London, said, “If the US and Israel help, I will go myself to fight Daesh (an acronym for Islamic State group), Al-Qaeda, Taliban and the Inter- Services Intelligence and Pakistan Army who created them.”  

After the new audio surfaced, Hussain’s posters were taken down from party strongholds and sector offices and also from streets and bylanes in Karachi in the past 24 hours.

The MQM supremo while addressing “Hindus” allegedly said, “We could not recognise the British conspiracy [to divide the subcontinent] and we became part of it.” 

While the authenticity of the clip has not been verified yet, but MQM leader Amir Khan said the party had nothing to do with Hussain’s statements. Accompanied by Coordination Committee Deputy Convener Farooq Sattar, Khan said, “Like Farooq Sattar had disassociated the party from Altaf Hussain’s earlier speech in our press conference (on Tuesday), we, the Pakistan Rabita Committee, disassociate ourselves from this recent speech.”  

Hussain, the leader of the single largest party in Karachi, has been accused of raising anti-Pakistan slogans at a rally here this week that turned violent. Several journalists were attacked by MQM activists. Pakistan on Tuesday charged Hussain with treason for his inflammatory speeches. 

Meanwhile, Paramilitary Rangers and police continued to crack down on the party that claims to represent Pakistan’s Urdu-speaking population. 
Next Story
Share it