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Matteo Renzi resigns, hints at early election in Italy

Matteo Renzi resigns, hints at early election in Italy
Matteo Renzi bowed out as Italian prime minister on Thursday with a combination of jokes, regrets and a strong hint that he wants to lead his party into an early election battle.

Forced to quit after a crushing referendum defeat, Renzi formally submitted his resignation to President Sergio Mattarella on Thursday evening.

The presidential palace said political consultations on forming a caretaker government would begin on Friday at 6 pm.

Before handing back the keys to his Palazzo Chigi residence, the 41-year-old chaired a meeting of the executive of his Democratic Party (PD).

“We are not afraid of anything or anybody, if other parties want to go to the polls .... the PD is not afraid of democracy or elections,” Renzi said, in reference to opposition clamour for a nationwide vote due in early 2018 to be brought forward by up to a year.

Ironically, Renzi’s rule came to an end with his government winning a vote of confidence in the Senate, the parliamentary chamber he tried to emasculate with a referendum in which he suffered a crushing defeat on Sunday.

The confidence vote curtailed prolonged discussion on the approval of Italy’s 2017 budget -- an unfinished task which had prompted Mattarella to ask Renzi to delay his departure for a few days.

“Budget law approved. Formal resignation at 1900. Thanks to everyone and viva l’Italia!” (“long live Italy!”) he tweeted. This being Italy, 1900 (7 pm) came and went, and Renzi had still not resigned.

After the talks at his party headquarters, Renzi said he assumed full responsibility for the referendum but gave no indication he was considering stepping down from the PD leadership. He said he would be spending on Friday, a public holiday, celebrating his grandmother’s 86th birthday. “We have to thank the elderly,” he said in a reference to pensioners supporting him in the referendum debate.

“And hopefully on Friday I will have more luck in the Playstation battle with my sons than I have had here,” he added.

Renzi’s speech sounded at times like the launch of an election campaign, with the former Florence mayor boasting of how he had left Italy with “fewer taxes and more rights” and pointedly playing up his leadership in the aftermath of a series of devastating earthquakes between August and October.
Agencies

Agencies

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