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Getting back what’s ours

Getting back what’s ours
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The National Museum in the Capital is holding a month long show of the single piece of work to emphasize on the fact that what belongs to the country must be strictly protected.

A seminar was held recently based on the same thought process where the unanimous consensus was that a detailed, nationwide documentation of all existing monuments across cultures and regions is essential so as to avert illicit international trafficking of antiques.

Simultaneously, the country requires an environment that encourages the development of a domestic market for artefacts by suitably amending the Antiquities Act, according to experts at the symposium on Return of Yogini: Art & Crime noted during day-long deliberations. The speakers also discussed ways of creating general awareness about heritage objects, thus promoting transparency through better informed public stakeholders.

The meet was organised by the National Museum Institute (NMI) as part of an ongoing exhibition — The return of the Yogini — that displays an exquisite 10th-century stone sculpture which recently returned to the country from Paris to where it was smuggled out a quarter century ago.

The single-object exhibition organised by the National Museum was to end on 6 October, but has been extended till 20 October, owing to public request, according to Dr Venu V, director-general of the museum.
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