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Higher antibiotics use may raise Parkinson's risk

Higher antibiotics use may raise Parkinsons risk

Excessive use of certain commonly used antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, a progressive nervous system disorder that leads to shaking, stiffness, and difficulty with walking, balance, and coordination, says a study.

This connection may be explained by their disruptive effects on the gut microbial ecosystem, said the study.

The strongest associations were found for broad spectrum antibiotics and those that act against against anaerobic bacteria and fungi.

"The link between antibiotic exposure and Parkinson's disease fits the current view that in a significant proportion of patients pathology of Parkinson's may originate in the gut, possibly related to microbial changes, years before the onset of typical Parkinson motor symptoms such as slowness, muscle stiffness and shaking of extremities," said research team.

"It was known that the bacterial composition of the intestine in Parkinson's patients is abnormal, but the cause is unclear. Our results suggest that some commonly used antibiotics, which are known to strongly influence the gut microbiota, could be a predisposing factor," they said. In the gut, pathological changes typical of Parkinson's disease have been observed up to 20 years before diagnosis. Constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have been associated with higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Exposure to antibiotics has been shown to cause changes in the gut microbiome and their use is associated with an increased risk of several diseases.

However, these diseases or increased susceptibility to infection do not explain the now observed relationship between antibiotics and

Parkinson's.

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