Top
Millennium Post

US-China 'bhai-bhai'

US-China  bhai-bhai

After years of quibbling, it has become clear that the concessions sought by North Korea are going too far – for both China and the US. As the prospect of a nuclear-armed North Korea peninsula worried Communist leaders in Beijing every bit as much as it did the Americans, the time has come for both the giants to give up their timidity. Till the recent past, while Beijing was willing to agree to any level of sanctions on North Korea, except those horrible enough to stand a chance of success, the successive US presidents have steeled themselves to negotiate with North Korea about its nuclear and missile programmes. Even the Washington had offered painful concessions, including the withdrawal of all sea- and land-based tactical nuclear weapons deployed abroad in 1991, a step that was necessary to get the North Koreans to the table for talks starting in 1993. But as Pyongyang had shocked the world by testing intercontinental ballistic missiles that may be capable of hitting the West Coast of America, the Trump administration unveiled an executive order imposing the most aggressive American sanctions on North Korea, including financial sanctions liable to have a chilling effect on the large Chinese banks that operate in America. And, as under this order, international banks that facilitate transactions with North Korean entities risk being banned from the American market, Chinese banks with hefty fines for aiding and abetting deals involving North Korea are only at arm's length – Beijing has no option left than to second Washington's scorn and anger for North Korea. But, it is nothing more than a marriage of convenience for them. While the Americans growl that the Chinese secretly like the way that North Korea keeps the Americans bogged down, the Chinese accuse the Americans of a selfish lack of imagination, for failing to offer such concessions as a freeze on large-scale military exercises with their allies in South Korea. Amid an unprecedented agreement between the US and China over North Korea, will Pyongyang step back from its great ambition, the nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting American territory? The sanctions imposed by the Washington

But, it is nothing more than a marriage of convenience for them. While the Americans growl that the Chinese secretly like the way that North Korea keeps the Americans bogged down, the Chinese accuse the Americans of a selfish lack of imagination, for failing to offer such concessions as a freeze on large-scale military exercises with their allies in South Korea. Amid an unprecedented agreement between the US and China over North Korea, will Pyongyang step back from its great ambition, the nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting American territory? The sanctions imposed by the Washington are basically aimed the goal of the sanctions was always intended to cut the Pyongyang's revenue so that they could do less of their reckless behaviour. One must not forget that if the sanctions would force the Kim regime to bring on its knees – it may cause a catastrophe, reminding the 1990's, when the North Korea's Stalinist, quasi-feudal rulers rode out a mass famine without falling. Now, the million dollar question is that is there any chance of 'talk' or 'diplomatic' solution between the US and North Korea? Though a series of insulting comments from Trump and Kim have made such a negotiated settlement more difficult, any concession from Washington may ease North Korea's anxiety. Trump's trash talks had deepened Kim's resistance to concessions and he is unlikely to back down in the face-off with Washington. It may be noted that for almost seven decades, North Korea's image has been that of a defiant small country, armed to the teeth, that survives by not giving in to any outside threat. The regime's attitude is: "We don't mind dying, but we'll make you pay a price that you won't want to pay." Surprisingly, even as the Trump administration used China as leverage against this meddlesome foe, Pyongyang seems

Trump's trash talks had deepened Kim's resistance to concessions and he is unlikely to back down in the face-off with Washington. It may be noted that for almost seven decades, North Korea's image has been that of a defiant small country, armed to the teeth, that survives by not giving in to any outside threat. The regime's attitude is: "We don't mind dying, but we'll make you pay a price that you won't want to pay." Surprisingly, even as the Trump administration used China as leverage against this meddlesome foe, Pyongyang seems denouncing the perfidy of its neighbour. But, the two super-powers in an in unprecedented agreement over Kim Jong-un's nuclear and missile programmes, some day or other both the countries would follow the doctrine of Cold War policy of deterrence and containment to put a check on it. But, to many political observers the 'wild card' to avert any tension between Washington and Pyongyang would be a dramatic gesture by the 'dramatic' Trump: to follow the path of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who pledged to 'go to Korea' in 1952, during the height of the Korean War. An initial statement to reduce tensions could also be followed by other confidence-building measures, and then, eventually, by talks about de-nuclearization and reduction of U.S. forces in the region. Burying the exchange of heated words during the recent past, both Washington and Pyongyang must stop cursing each other now and go for some new dealing with open arms. China, too, would not take it in a bad taste.


Next Story
Share it