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Millennium Post

Learning and education

Learning and education

It is unfortunate enough that Indian society and the examination system have come to narrow down learning by way of evaluation with the marks that a child scores. Further, from the systemic perspective of matters, the no-detention policy of the RTE Act, 2009, was amended through a parliamentary bill earlier this year, stating that a child who fails a regular examination at the end of classes V and VIII will take a re-examination. It is unlikely that the new detention policy in Delhi schools will be rolled out this year. As matters stand, Delhi schools are yet to be notified of amendments in the no-detention policy which were to be implemented in the 2019-2020 academic year. Consequently, educationists believe it is too late in the day to enable schools to detain students in classes V and VIII this session. While the eternal Indian debate may rear it head again that an examination is not test of a child's learning of their capacity to learn, but just that of their memory and retention, it must also be granted that some imperfect system must be put in place to align the inclination of children generally towards a king a learning they may be free to choose and pursue eventually. Amendments in Delhi's policy were cleared in August by the state government, allowing all government, MCD, and private schools to hold back students in classes V and VIII if they are unable to clear the re-exam. The implementation of that has been stalled. There is a need to bring in change in the assessment model to include evaluation based on a variety of criteria apart from standard testing. Methods like 15 per cent for attendance, 10 per cent for participation in co-curricular activities like dance, theatre, debates, sports, community service and Olympiads, are a healthy start to creating an environment for children to learn well and eventually perform better.

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