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Congress-CPI(M) alliance in tatters as Left Front meeting ends in fiasco

 MPost |  2016-03-21 01:09:21.0  |  Kolkata

Congress-CPI(M) alliance in tatters as Left Front  meeting ends in fiasco

The Left Front meeting held in CPI(M) state headquarters on Alimuddin Street ended in an inconclusive way after the Front partners asked why they should sacrifice their seats for the CPI(M). Earlier, the Front partners had said that they would not share dais with Congress. Also, there will not be any joint rallies. 

Though the CPI(M) had earlier termed this tie up as the people’s alliance, now they are realising that even the Front partners have questioned the validity of the alliance and even questioned whether opinion of people were sought before forming the alliance with Congress.

Finding no other option, Left Front Chairman Biman Bose said that attempts were on to resolve the impasse and the problems would be ironed out. 

However, he could not specify when the problem would be over.

Kshiti Goswami, State secretary of RSP said that the party had always fielded 23 candidates and this was brought down to 19 following requests from CPI(M). But now the party finds that in nine seats there would be a triangular fight. 

They are Malatipur, Suti, Raghunathgunj, Baroan, Nowda, Bharatpur, Alipurduar, Tapan and Kalchini. Of these nine seats, six seats are situated in Murshidabad where Congress has fielded candidates and under no circumstance will the candidates from these seats be withdrawn, Adhir Chowdhury, WBPCC president said. 

He said that these seats were Congress stronghold and if required friendly fights would be held. 

But the Opposition leaders said that if the problems were not resolved Trinamool would use this in their campaign.

The leaders went up to the extent to say that CPI(M) was trying to make RSP exist only in signboard affecting its interest badly. 

“It is the primary duty of Left Front partners to ensure that their interests are well preserved. 

“As with this in mind the Left Front was set up in 1977 before the election,” Goswami said adding: 

“The party was carefully studying the situation and it will have to chalk out its plan for the future carefully.”

Echoing Goswami’s voice, Forward Bloc leaders said it had been difficult to make people understand the necessity of the alliance. 

“The slogan of corruption and establishment of democracy are old and voters have no interest in these issues. We will have to project alternative development model without which it will be difficult to get votes,” he said. 

The biggest question now is how CPI(M) builds up confidence among its partners.

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