Home > Features > ‘Classical fusion needs dedication’

‘Classical fusion needs dedication’

 Anubha Singh |  2013-01-16 22:43:30.0  |  New Delhi

‘Classical fusion needs dedication’

‘Playing a tabla along with drums or a sitar with a guitar is not called fusion music. It’s much more than a permutation combination of an Indian and Western instrument,’ says Abhay Rustum Sopori.

The santoor player is all set to present his fusion concert on Wednesday by presenting a beautiful blend of authentic Hindustani classical music with Western, Latin and the essence of contemporary music. ‘According to me, classical fusion is about selecting a

raga and maintaining its purity and essence throughout. It’s composed after long dedication as the most difficult part is to maintain the blend of classical music along with the contemporary feel,’ Sopori added.

Sopori has composed music for various national and international award-winning films and documentaries. His works also include Mahatma, a film by the government of India on Mahatma Gandhi, that was presented at the United Nations marking the first International Non-violence Day.

‘My aim is to take and bring music from Jammu and Kashmir as I belong to the Sufiana gharana of Kashmir. Being in the field for almost two decades, I want classical music to go places,’ he said.

‘Classical music today has lost its ground owing to lack of patience by many classical artistes. They look for short cuts to promote their music and progress. Our music itself has a lot of variety which can be explored to a large extent through sincere dedication and perseverance. Music is like the cycle of life which is continously revolving,’ said Sopori.

Talking about his performance in the Capital on Wednesday, Sopori said: ‘I am going to present a three- piece music on my santoor. It’s a mix of Persian Sufi, Kashmiri Sufi and Kashmiri folk along with five other musicians for an hour,’ said Sopori. The versatile and young santoor player learnt his music from SaMaPa academy which he calls a cultural movement based on the traditional
guru-shishya parampara.


‘SaMaPa is a platform for young and old musicians who are passionate about their music. It enables them to utilise the power of music in leading a more balanced life, as well as exploring opportunities with music as means to their employment. We cannot depend on the government and sponsors for funds always,’ he added.


DETAIL


At: Stein Auditorium, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road
When: Today
Timings- 7 pm onwards

Anubha Singh

Anubha Singh

Millennium Post Contributors help bring you the latest news around you.


Share it
Top