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Celebrating the spirit of women

Celebrating the spirit of women
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Women’s Moksha, a women’s organisation, has organised Abhoni 2014, the Artisans Crafts Bazaar and Bengali Food Festival  to commemorate the 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda and to celebrate the International Women’s Day. The festival which will go on till 10 March has been organised to promote the cause of women empowerment and the power of youth in our society.

 The festival which was inaugurated by the Resident Commissioner of West Bengal, Bhaskar Khulbe, looks ahead to promote handloom, handicraft, jute products, food and the varied culture of India. It also aims to provide special emphasis to the tribal and rural segment of the country. A Dog show and mock drill will be demonstration by the National Disaster Response Force team during the festival to make the youth and the common man understand the ground realities of natural calamities and how to cope with such eventualities.

Swami Vivekananda held women in high esteem and appreciated their spirit of service and compassion. For the youth of this country Swami Vivekananda is a role model, an icon of dynamism and vibrancy. He ignited young minds saying ‘my faith is in the younger generation, the modern generation, out of them will come my workers. They will work out the whole problem like lions’.  The festival following Vivekananda’s thoughts looks to contribute by creating a platform where youth and women from across the country can come together and share their ideas and bridge the barriers of race, colour, religion and gender.

This festival is a conscious effort by Women’s Moksha to create a credible platform for the women and youth of this country to come together and showcase their culture and tradition. This shall be a stage where women and youth from different states shall get an opportunity to share their culture, tradition, thoughts, skills and talent.

Some of the award winning talent of India will also be showcasing their talent during the festival. Some of which include Nagender from A.P. to Naim Khan pottery of Uttar Pradesh. Pattachitra of Orisaa and Jamdani from bengal represented by Akshaye Barik and Khokan Nandy. Abahoni also aims to focus on the culture, tradition and different forms of textiles of Eastern part of India including states like West Bengal, Bihar, Odisha, Jharkhand and Chhatisgarh.

The major attraction of the festival is the Artisans Craft Bazaar which will witness participation by artisans from across the country. The objective is to promote rural and tribal handicraft and handloom in India. The artisans and women  entrepreneurs shall showcase their work from handloom, handicraft and jute products which in a way will provide them a platform to get a larger audience and market for their work.

Other major attraction of the event would be the food festival  which will display varied dishes and cuisines from the eastern part of the country. The festival shall witness participants serving diverse varieties and items with several recipes from Bengal, and  some exclusive Mughlai dishes. There would also be a special  Bengali food stall serving more than 100 nostalgic Bengali dishes.

The cultural shows during the festival will witness some renowned local artists from Bengal who would showcase their talent. The fest will also feature different forms of folk dances and music. The festival shall create awareness on the rich and cultural heritage. Such festivals for the youth not only reflect the spirit of friendship but also peace and development. Besides all this, this festival shall provide a nation-wide exposure to the youth for the expression and fulfilment of their cultural talents and aspiration.

Women’s Moksha is an organisation dedicated to promote eco- friendly products, principally jute, which have been crafted by the rural section of the Indian Society, thereby empowering them to be self reliant as well as enabling a traditional industry to flourish.

WHEN: On till 10 March
WHERE: Indira Gandhi National Centre For Arts, 3, Rajendra Prasad Road
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