Home > Features > Capturing creatures of wilderness

Capturing creatures of wilderness

 Anubha Singh |  2012-10-29 22:21:32.0  |  New Delhi

Capturing creatures of wilderness

‘The co-existence of the wild and various other life forms is important to maintain the balance of the ecosystem. Unfortunately with the expansion of the modern civilisation, the survival of the wild is in real danger and faces a possible extinction in the near future,’ Archna Singh states her concern.

The wildlife photographer has captured the life and beauty of the animals at various jungles and locations in South Africa, Kenya and India. Through her pictures she wishes to passionately portray the emotions and expressions of the forest beings who according to her have as much right to exist as us.


‘Just because they cannot speak doesn’t mean that they don’t have the same feelings as us. I aspire to not merely bring forward the beauty of these innocent trusting souls but depict various emotions and feelings of these magnificent creatures and capture the essence of their souls,’ she adds.

Her first solo exhibition ‘On Higher Ground’ is aimed to make the viewer fall in love with the beauty that surrounds us, so all of us can appreciate the beauty in these creatures and in turn help save our rapidly declining wildlife. It is the first step towards educating and creating awareness amongst the masses about the importance of preserving our wilderness.

‘My foray into the world of photography began in 2006 while assisting Delhi based ace photographer Akhil Bakhshi. Working behind the lens was a thoroughly enjoyable experience and self-learning and experimentation have brought me to where I stand today. Photography encouraged me to combine my passion with my deep love for wildlife,’ Archna says.

‘I spent close to a month capturing the true essence of nature at its best in close proximity to the creatures we’re only just beginning to understand during her visit to Kenya. Am a frequent visitor to the Ranthambore National Park, Rajasthan and have also shot at various remote locales in Ladakh,’ she says.

Archna Singh runs a community called Orah Wildlife (consisting of like minded lovers of wildlife) which did an Audio Visual show – Beauty in the beast, earlier in March at the India Habitat Centre.

‘The AV show is an eye opener upon the various ways that we humans are destructing our wild. Our belief is that spreading awareness is the first step towards it and that is what we intend to carry on with Beauty in the beast,’ she commented. ‘I hope through my art I can create awareness about our wildlife, reach out to more people, educatethem about the need of the hour and in turn create respect towards all God’s creatures. This is my motto,’ says the 39 year old.


DETAIL


At: Visual Art Gallery, India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road
On till: 1st November
Timings: 11 am to 7 pm

Anubha Singh

Anubha Singh

Millennium Post Contributors help bring you the latest news around you.


Share it
Top