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Bollywood doesn’t excite me anymore: Lucky Ali

Bollywood doesn’t excite me anymore: Lucky Ali
As you get exposed to various fascinating aspects of Lucky Ali’s personality, it is not as hard as you think to understand the man. Singer, part-time actor, part-time environmentalist and full-time philosopher ...call him what you may, but his beliefs and comments, laced with his typically reflective observations, make a fascinating study. Ahead of his concert in the national capital, we caught up with the versatile singer.

From cleaning carpets to organic farming you have done it all, tell us about your fascinating journey?
 There is nothing special in what I do. My journey has been like anybody else’s. To be successful, one should not look at things commercially, rather should focus on his/her duty and let everything else fall into place. If you develop such an attitude, success and failure will not affect you much.

Which part of the world do you find the best?
There is no place like our own country in the whole world. India has got the essence of countries like Norway, Sweden, South America, and the Sahara Desert. I am not suggesting that one should not go out, travelling helps you explore the world but at the end of the day it also makes you realise the importance of your own country.

You had a brief but impactful career in Bollywood, do you have any projects lined up?
Bollywood doesn’t excite me anymore. I am not interested in the kind of work the film industry is doing. We are light years behind in terms of technology and lack creativity too. The industry is busy making money in a hurry, which unfortunately is killing  creativity.

How do you connect to music?
To begin with, I don’t even have a music system at home. I come from a cultural family and music, dance, stories are very strongly embedded in our culture. Music is a part of me, I didn’t have to go to a special school to learn it, it all came from within. Though education plays a major role in shaping you, but I am more like a rolling stone. I like to be polished in the work I do.

You have worked with various star music composers like A.R Rahman, Vishal Bhardwaj, Vishal-Shekhar and Mike McCleary... with whom did you like working the most?
In terms of humanity, I find AR Rahman the best. In many ways Rahman is like our late President APJ Abdul Kalam, he is the president of the music industry. I have seen him grow as a star. He is doing his bit for society through his music school. 

He has not limited himself to only rich students and is also teaching children from marginal families. Vishal Bhardwaj is a fantastic composer and I find him very refined. Vishal and Shekar, on the other hand, are more like current rock stars as they understand the pulse of the youngsters.

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