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Spot the unusual: Rukshaan art

Spot the unusual: Rukshaan art
Sanjay Barot's canvasses come alive with the beauty of fine details and meticulous moorings. Treatment and finesse are paramount in these works brought by Ruskshaan Art Mumbai.
Barot's eight works at are an epitome of devotion and distinct allegories in time. "Every canvas is enclosed or mounted with a wooden frame (differently constructed for each canvas) that has been lovingly treated with images, color, layers and texture ," says Rukshaan Krishna . " For example, people known and unknown, particularly those that have managed to make a mark in society and rise through the legacy of life have been portrayed on the frame. These wooden frames work as frames of construction for the work and also as the entry point of the society that Sanjay has painted for his viewers."
The artist asserts that these can be read as the 'final impressions' that have been culled out from the chaos in the canvas. The chaos on the canvas is patterned by bold lines that have been layered almost a hundred times along with passages that provide space for the playing out of truths that are personal to the artist. And some, we as viewers may empathize with.
Barot speaks of his sensibility, and says: " My creative process is really like my beliefs. They have travelled with me from when I moved from my village in Kapadvanj to the city that I now live in and love, Baroda. Layers and layers. I return to my hometown every 6 months and with every visit, the roots get stronger and help me cope with the chaos of city life." However, it is only upon drawing closer to the canvas that one can experience the interesting interplay of man and his moments, architectural forms and objects from his beloved hometown and socio-political incidents that have had a bearing on the artist.
Rukshaan Art has credentials of commitment rare to see in the modern day art world practices where greed and commerce drive every act. Rukshaan Art hosts works of contemporary artists who are based in or have studied at or work in Baroda, Gujarat. Gallery owner Rukshaan Krishna is the reason behind Baroda March, a decade-old tradition wherein close to 50 'Barodian' contemporary artists showcase their works at the Coomaraswamy Hall, at Mumbai's Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangharalaya every March.
Artists from Baroda, opines the brilliant and deeply admired and respected, Rukshaan have high integrity. Recently she had a historic culling of the works of the 80 year old doyen Jyoti Bhatt who is a legend in the world of intaglio as well as photography. "These artists are in constant conversation with each other. As a result, there's learning and encouragement. They are not proud but have their pride. They also care about the career graphs of one another,its unheard of in the art community elsewhere."
Uma Nair

Uma Nair

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